Columbia River Fishing Report 9/26/2016

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09/26/2016 – John Snyder – Fishing The Columbia 

 

2016 Columbia River Fishing Report:

 

I finally got a hold of the Swanny and was able to get the low down on the Columbia river system. Right now above warrior rock the fishing has been decent to fare with good numbers of fish being caught. There were tons of boats in the water with an average of 1.5 fish per boat. The method producing results was fishing pro troll flashers trailing a Brads Super Bait with herring fillet inside or stink.

 


This Report is courtesy of Bill Swann of Swannys Fishing Guide Service. If you are looking for a top notch fishing guide give Swanny a call (360) 446-5177 or (206) 755-1204

 

This concludes our 2016 Columbia River Fishing Report

 


 

Columbia River Fishing Report 9-22-2016

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09/22/2016- John Snyder – Fishing The Columbia (FTC)

 

2016 Columbia River Fishing Report:

 

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE

 

 

Columbia River sport fishery for fall chinook remains open

Action:  Allows retention of hatchery chinook on the mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 upstream to Warrior Rock. 

Species affected: Hatchery chinook, which can be identified by a clipped adipose fin or a left ventral fin.

Effective dates: Friday, Sept. 23, through Thursday, Sept. 30, 2016.

Daily Limit

  • Buoy 10: Chinook minimum size is 24 inches. Coho minimum size is 16 inches. The daily limit is two fish, of which only one may be a chinook. Only one hatchery steelhead may be retained per day. Release all salmon other than hatchery chinook (marked with a clipped adipose or left-ventral fin) and coho with a clipped adipose fin.
  • Tongue Point/Rocky Point to Warrior Rock: Minimum size is 12-inches. The daily limit is six fish, but only two may be adults and only one of those adult fish may be a hatchery chinook. Only one hatchery steelhead may be retained per day. Release all salmon other than hatchery chinook (marked with a clipped adipose or left-ventral fin) and coho with a clipped adipose fin.

Reason for action: Harvestable numbers of hatchery salmon remain available based on current chinook forecasts and harvest estimates to date.

Information contact:  (360) 696-6211. For the latest information press *1010.

 


This Report is courtesy of Bill Swann of Swannys Fishing Guide Service. If you are looking for a top notch fishing guide give Swanny a call (360) 446-5177 or (206) 755-1204

 

This concludes our 2016 Columbia River Fishing Report

 


 

Columbia River Fishing Report 9/22/2016

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09/22/2016 – John Snyder – Fishing The Columbia 

 

2016 Columbia River Fishing Report:

 

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

 

 

Buoy 10, Lower Columbia River Chinook seasons extended

 

CLACKAMAS, Ore. – Anglers will have through Sept. 30 to keep hatchery Chinook salmon from Buoy 10 upstream to the Warrior Rock/Bachelor Island deadline, under rules adopted today by fishery managers from Oregon and Washington.

The season extension is the third one this month and allows Chinook retention in the ongoing Buoy 10 and Lower Columbia River fisheries to continue through Sept. 30. After that, both areas are scheduled to reopen to retention of any Chinook, effective Oct. 1 – Dec. 31, under permanent rules.

Today’s action means only hatchery Chinook may be retained from Buoy 10 upstream to Warrior Rock through Sept. 30. All wild fish must be released unharmed. The daily adult bag limit is two salmonids a day, of which only one may be a Chinook and only one may be a hatchery steelhead.

For more information, please visit ODFW’s on-line Regulation Update Page and click on Columbia Zone updates.

 


This Report is courtesy of Bill Swann of Swannys Fishing Guide Service. If you are looking for a top notch fishing guide give Swanny a call (360) 446-5177 or (206) 755-1204

 

This concludes our 2016 Columbia River Fishing Report

 


 

Columbia River Fishing Report 3-29-2016

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03/29/2016- John Snyder – Fishing The Columbia (FTC)

 

2016 Columbia River Fishing Report:

 

The Springers are definitely here, we are catching limits or near limits of Spring Chinook daily. There are Springers through out the entire River system. I focus our efforts in holding flats or other wise known as staging flats. These fish are in no hurry to get up river, so they will hang around in these areas. Be consistent in your trolling, if you decide to anchor and sit it can either be very good or really tough!

This Report is courtesy of Bill Swann of Swannys Fishing Guide Service. If you are looking for a top notch fishing guide give Swanny a call (360) 446-5177 or (206) 755-1204

 

This concludes our 2016 Columbia River Fishing Report

 


 

WDFW Removes Limits For Bass, Walley, and Channel Catfish on the Columbia


03/02/2016 – John W. Snyder –  Fishing The Columbia 

 

WDFW suspends fishing limits for bass, walleye, channel catfish on Columbia River

 

OLYMPIA – Starting March 3, anglers can fish for bass, walleye and channel catfish without daily catch or size limits from the mouth of the Columbia River 545 miles upstream to Chief Joseph Dam.

An emergency rule approved by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) removes the remaining limits for those species on the Columbia River downstream from the Washington/Oregon state line, 17 miles above McNary Dam.

It also lifts fishing limits for those species on nearly two-dozen tributaries flowing into that section of the Columbia River.

The new rule is consistent with fishing regulations in effect since 2013 on the upper Columbia River and with those approved last year for boundary waters shared by Washington and Oregon further downstream, said Bruce Bolding, WDFW warmwater fish manager.

“The immediate purpose of this emergency rule is to bring the fishing regulations into alignment on both sides of the big river,” Bolding said. “Oregon’s rule deregulating these fisheries has been in place since Jan. 1, but Washington’s new permanent regulations don’t take effect until July 1. This emergency measure bridges the gap so that both states have concurrent regulations.”

Tributaries affected – all or in part – by that action include Camas Slough, Chinook River, Deep River, Grays River, Skamokawa Creek, Elochoman River, Mill Creek (Cowlitz Co.), Abernathy Creek, Germany Creek, Coal Creek, Falls Creek (Cowlitz Co.), Kalama River, Cowlitz River, Lewis River, Salmon Creek (Clark Co.), Washougal River, Hamilton Creek, Rock Creek (Skamania Co.), Wind River, Drano Lake, White Salmon River, Klickitat River, and Rock Creek (Klickitat Co.).

Fishing seasons, boundaries and other rules for those rivers and streams are described on WDFW’s website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

The main goal of deregulating the fisheries for bass, walleye and channel catfish is to increase the harvest of those non-native species, Bolding said.

“All three species are abundant, and prey on juvenile salmon and steelhead that are listed for protection under the federal Endangered Species Act,” he said. “These new rules are designed to help address that issue.”

 

Source: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/erule.jsp?id=1760

 


 

Columbia River Fishing Report 02-23-2016

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02/23/2016 – J. W. Snyder – Fishing The Columbia

Columbia River Fishing Report

 

This weeks Columbia River Fishing Report indicates the Columbia river has been running high and green with about 2-3 feet of visibility. There are a ton of smelt in the river as well as a few Spring Chinook starting to show. I would definitely focus around the Holding flats from Kalama to Mouth of Lewis River all the way up to Vancouver. These are prime areas that the chinook like to hold before moving up river. Methods that have been working well are trolling Herring with a 1 foot dropper, make sure to shorten your leaders up 4-5ft, You want to tap the bottom every 5 seconds or so to keep it in the Zone.

 

This Report is courtesy of Bill Swann of Swannys Fishing Guide Service. If you are looking for a top notch fishing guide give Swanny a call (360) 446-5177 or (206) 755-1204

 

 

 


 

 

WDFW to allow public comment on lower Columbia river hatchery reform plan.

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December 4, 2015 – J. W. Snyder – Fishing The Columbia

 

The state has decided to extent the courtesy of public comment on the current hatchery reform plan for the lower Columbia River. 

 

OLYMPIA – The public is invited to comment on a new plan designed to align state fisheries and hatchery operations to support the recovery of wild salmon and steelhead populations in the lower Columbia River Basin.

The Lower Columbia Conservation and Sustainable Fisheries Plan, jointly produced by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB), is available for review at www.lcfrb.gen.wa.us

Comments on the plan will be accepted through Jan. 22 via email at info@lcfrb.gen.wa.us or postal mail: LCFRB, 2127 8th Ave, Longview, WA 98632.

The new management plan is based on the statewide Hatchery and Fishery Reform Policy adopted by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission in 2009. It also reflects the findings of the Hatchery and Scientific Review Group (HSRG), established by Congress in 2000 to guide state reform efforts.

Management strategies outlined in the plan include those put into action since 2009 and others proposed for the future, said Cindy Le Fleur, WDFW fish manager for southwest Washington.

“The goal of this plan is to return natural-origin salmon and steelhead populations to healthy, harvestable levels in the Columbia River Basin,” Le Fleur said. “We’ve already taken significant steps toward that goal, and we want to hear what people have to say about past and proposed actions.”

Current initiatives range from increasing the use of wild fish for hatchery broodstock to suspending production of hatchery steelhead on rivers designated as “wild steelhead gene banks.”

These and other actions described in the plan are designed to minimize risks to wild salmon and steelhead populations posed by hatchery fish and hatchery operations.

Known hazards include interbreeding, disease, and competition for spawning areas, as well as hatchery structures that block the movement of wild fish upstream.

NOAA-Fisheries has frequently cited these risks as a contributing factor in listing wild salmon and steelhead populations for protection the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Jeff Breckel, director of the LCFRB, said the new hatchery and fishery reform plan for the Columbia River Basin is consistent with the goals of the recovery plan for the region approved by NOAA-Fisheries. The board was created by the state Legislature to lead a collaborative effort to recover salmon and steelhead in Southwest Washington.

“Our organization is pleased to be a partner in developing this plan,” Breckel said. “It represents a big step forward in efforts to recover threatened salmon and steelhead, while continuing to provide hatchery fish for harvest.”

Under the adaptive management approach described in the plan, all initiatives will be assessed based on how fish populations respond to those changes. Key actions taken to date include:

  • Incorporating wild fish into the hatchery broodstock for chinook, coho and steelhead production.
  • Designating three rivers as wild steelhead gene banks by discontinuing hatchery releases in the East Fork Lewis and North Fork Toutle/Green rivers, as well as continuing the strategy of not releasing hatchery steelhead on the Wind River.
  • Installing weirs to control the number of hatchery fish on the spawning grounds on the Grays, Elochoman, Green, Coweeman, Cowlitz, Kalama, and Washougal rivers.
  • Testing the use of purse seines and beach seines to selectively harvest hatchery salmon in designated areas of the lower Columbia River.
  • Expanding mark-selective recreational fisheries, and requiring anglers to retain any hatchery steelhead they catch in some waters.

The Lower Columbia Conservation and Sustainable Fisheries Plan is also available for review on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01767/

 


Columbia River Fishing Report – 07/22/2015


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07/22/2015 – J. W. Snyder – Fishing The Columbia

 

Columbia River Fishing Report

 

The Columbia river is offering up some excellent fishing. Lots of salmon and steelhead working through the river system providing prime time fishing through pretty much the entire river. My friend Dave Graybill says that the Brewster pool is the place to be. regular limits of Sockeye are being caught and decent numbers of Chinook as well.

On the lower Columbia, top fishing guide Perry Harmon says, they have been getting regular limits and catching a tons of steelhead and sockeye as well.

This concludes our Columbia River Fishing Report

 


Columbia River Fishing Report – 07/10/2015


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07/10/2015 – J. W. Snyder – Fishing The Columbia 

 

Columbia River Fishing Report

The Columbia river has been Hot! Hot! Hot! The lower is producing excellent Chinook opportunities and the Sockeye are coming on strong. The upper is giving anglers plenty of Sockeye action and some Chinook as well.

If you have the chance this weekend hit the Columbia. Right now it’s the hottest fishing in town.

This concludes our 2015 Columbia River Fishing Report


Columbia River Fishing Report – 06/30/2015


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06/30/2015 – J. W. Snyder – Fishing The Columbia

 

Columbia River Fishing Report

 

Columbia River Rule Change – from Hwy. 173 Bridge at Brewster to Chief Joseph Dam Area (545)

Open to Salmon retention from July 1-Oct. 15 Min. size 12″. Daily limit 8. Up to 2 may be adult hatchery CHINOOK and up to 6 may be SOCKEYE. Release COHO and wild adult CHINOOK.

 

This concludes our 2015 Columbia River Fishing Report